Leslieville Roots: The Roothams

I wonder how many in our neighbourhood have Red Seal builders in their family trees? There is a small clue in this rather mundane article from the Toronto Star of October 25, 1917. Lewis Rootham was a contractor who built many of the houses on the lower of Woodfield, Connaught and neighbouring streets. But heContinue reading “Leslieville Roots: The Roothams”

October: The Month from Hell

By October 12, the hospitals were triaging, turning away patients they thought might have a chance of survival or just accepting patients on a first-come-first-served basis. Doctors and nurses were not seeing those we would think would be least likely to survive: elderly, frail people and young children and infants. Those who were dying were, overwhelmingly, young and healthy men and women, in all neighbourhoods including older areas in the East End such as Riverside, Leslieville and Todmorden and new neighbourhoods spreading across the farm fields of the Ashbridges, Charles Coxwell Small, the Sammons, Cosburns and others. Even the new cottage communities along the Beach were not spared.

Self-guided Tour: Bricks, Devils and a Pocket

Your mission …to explore strange familiar worlds; to seek out life amid urban civilization; to boldly go where everyone has gone before. By Joanne Doucette INTRODUCTION This self-guided tour encompasses the area bounded by Danforth on the north, Gerrard Street on the south, Jones Avenue on the west and Greenwood Avenue including the east side.Continue reading “Self-guided Tour: Bricks, Devils and a Pocket”

From Farm to Shacktown to Bungalowland: Gerrard-Coxwell

City Engineers Map 1892 Showing the boundaries of the City of Toronto as “City Limit” in red. The lot lines still show, but streets hadn’t been built on them yet. The lot lines were the farm boundaries and had muddy lanes the farmers used to access their fields. Coxwell Avenue is a rough dirt road.Continue reading “From Farm to Shacktown to Bungalowland: Gerrard-Coxwell”